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RIAS Clydebank Bridge Canopy Competition

   

The idea is to extract a shape from Clydebank’s ship-building heritage and abstract it into a dynamic new form that energises the canal. The canopy takes the ship propeller as an initial point of reference and abstracts the form through sinuous lines to reflect motion, rotation and cover.

A myriad of interpretations exist……..........flower petals, leaves, feathers, propellers, vertebrae - we see a beautiful sculptural form that glides across water.

   

A Sculptural form that responds to the aspirations of Clydebank’s strategy for Art in public places - canopy and sculpture as one hovering above the bridge.

The canopy takes the ship propeller as an initial point of reference and abstracts the form through sinuous lines to reflect motion, rotation and cover. The apparent complexity of the canopy belies the simplicity of the repeated form.

   

Only three components exist – the structural arch, the repeated propeller and the slender secondary structural lines. The primary arch allows the transfer of services across the bridge and defines a zone for canopy lighting.

   
Only one material exists………reclaimed ship building steel. 80-90% of the steel used in the world is recycled – we are investigating the potential to use new and recycled steel, with a factory applied protective coating that will minimise ongoing maintenance.    
The simplicity of the canopy (one material, three components and repeated forms), combined with factory fabrication and ease of site erection will ensure programme deliverability and early cost certainty - our initial cost analysis already indicates that the canopy can be successfully delivered within the budget.